Men of Glenburton

Overview: 

 "We celebrate the things we have in common and respect each other's differences." 

 "Men of Glenburton" is a men's (18 plus) community based organization with its primary influence in the Glen Iris and Ashburton areas. It is founded on a broad based set of values of help and care for other humans. Anglican, Baptist Catholic and other faiths and belief systems are represented. One's colour, race, religion, creed or status is no restriction to participation. 


Purpose: 

 "Develop our skills so we can continually make a difference in our family, our community and ourselves." 

 "Men generally talk about what they do. They do not discuss their emotions, personal needs or ask for help." 


The aim of the Men on Glenburton is to be supportive, open up discussion, share skills and mentor each other. It will also be outward looking and seeking opportunities to help men and others in the community. Values: Men of Glenburton share and promote these.

Values: 

  • Receptive
  • Engaging
  • Caring Sharing
  • Interactive
  • Non-partisan


Men of Glenburton Website

MoGs at Sacred Heart Mission

For some time the Men of Glenburton have been looking for opportunities to add some community activity to our regular Talks and social events.

John Davies and Peter Johnson led this initiative, and, following research and investigation by John, the three of us recently spent a day as Volunteer Meal Assistants at the Sacred Heart Mission in St. Kilda.

Sacred Heart Mission provides a meals service 365 days a year, serving up to 300 meals every day, for people who are homeless or are disadvantaged and socially isolated. In Grey Street St. Kilda the Mission operates a well equipped commercial kitchen and a well-appointed dining hall seating about 60. Food is largely donated – much of it here from South Melbourne Market – and the chefs have to work out a menu based on the available ingredients, many of which are fast approaching their use-by dates.

We joined about 12 other volunteers in preparing, serving and clearing up the lunchtime meal. As first-timers we arrived at 9.00am to receive a short induction which focused, firstly, on the strict hygiene standards maintained in the kitchen and dining area, and secondly the appropriate way in which we should interact with the “clients” who were coming in for lunch.


The other volunteers were of course wonderfully interesting and engaging people and fun to work with. The Mission has about 200 volunteers on the roster, and many attend weekly or fortnightly, but they always need more. They were very grateful for the relatively little we did to help them, and we left feeling it is a very worthwhile service and that we will endeavour to build up a “bank” of, say, 8 MoGs (and, indeed, WoGs as more than half the volunteers are women) that will enable us to provide 4 volunteers one day each month to assist them.

We will certainly be going back to help again – and we hope you’ll consider joining us.


Julian Barrat

17 October 2017